9 Different Methods To Get Your Child On Your Back With Video Links

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When beginning to back carry it’s easy to feel slightly daunted. You have just mastered front carrying, back carrying is something that you are not sure you will ever be able to do. You do some research but there are so many back carrying videos on the internet its tough to decide which one is the right one?

We have whittled it down to 9 different methods to get your child on your back when beginning to back carry. All have a degree of learning, some are easier than other and some are more suited to an older child. We have also included the access compatibility for those with a visual and hearing impairment.

We advise you take the time to watch them all and choose the version you feel most comfortable with. Always make sure you practise any babywearing over a soft surface such as a bed or sofa. Alternatively, you can have someone ‘spot’ for you to ensure baby doesn’t fall.

 

 

 

Are you new to back carrying or babywearing? Or feeling worried you may drop your child? The ‘walk like an Egyptian’ method by Wrap you in love, is great as you do not even have to unbuckle the carrier to get from front to back. Great for the more nervous babywearer. It has clear subtitles to help you when trying for yourself for those with a hearing impairment, but isn’t suitable for those with a visual impairment.

 

 

 

 

This method for beginning to back carry from Ergobaby and is great for those who have less flexibility in their arms. It gives you tips to get the sizing right prior to putting baby in and keeps you holding baby the whole time whilst scooting baby onto your back. This video does not have subtitles to help the hard of hearing, but does has clear verbal instructions for those with a visual impairment.

 

 

 

This is an alternative method for beginning to back carry that needs a relative amount of coordination and flexibility to execute. It keeps your baby close to your body, which can be reassuring to beginners and can be carried out easily on the go. This video does not have subtitles but the verbals instructions help aid the visual concept. This video is not accessible for those with a visual impairment.

 

 

 

This method for beginning to back carry from Sheffield Sling Surgery needs a fair bit of flexibility, however it is one of the easier methods to execute and can be done on the move and still keeps baby on a secure position. The video has neither subtitles or verbal instructions, so is unsuitable for those with a visual impairment. However the video is visually very clear for beginners with a hearing impairment.

 

 

 

 

This second method for beginning to back carry from Sheffield Sling Surgery is similar to the Ergobaby method but shows a good method of tightening straps whilst keeping the infant close to you at all times. The video has neither subtitles or verbal instructions, so is unsuitable for those with a visual impairment. However the video is visually very clear for beginners with a hearing impairment.

 

 

 

 

For those of you that are slightly more experienced this method for beginning to back carry is great for getting baby nice and high from the get go. It needs a good amount of coordination and should only be used from an older infant. The video has neither subtitles or  clear verbal instructions for those with a sight or hearing impairment.

 

 

This method for beginning to back carry from North East Sling Library is great for beginners as you use a chair to get baby onto your back, is great if you are fearful of dropping or are generally not very confident. The video has no subtitles for those with a hearing impairment, but does have very clear verbal instructions for those with a visual impairment.

 

 

 

This method for beginning to back carry is completely different from the rest and should over be used for older infants who are capable of holding onto the wearer. The video has very few subtitles, but the face of the person in the video is very clear for those with the ability to lip-read. The verbal instructions are not very clear for those with a visual impairment.

 

 

 

This last version from Wrap The Rainbow is straight -forward and quick using the hip-scoot method, it keeps the infant close to your body and doesn’t need a huge amount of flexibility. The video has no subtitles but is clear and concise for those with a hearing impairment to follow. There is no verbal instructions so would make this video unsuitable for those with a visual impairment.

So there you have it. 9 different methods to get your child onto your back using a buckled carrier when learning how to back carry.

 

 

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